Undulated Antshrike by Joe Tobias, all rights reserved Etymology: In reference to Frederick Vavasour…

Undulated Antshrike by Joe Tobias, all rights reserved Etymology: In reference to Frederick Vavasour McConnell First Described By: Sparman, 1787 Classification: Dinosauromorpha, Dinosauriformes, Dracohors, Dinosauria, Saurischia, Eusaurischia, Theropoda, Neotheropoda, Averostra, Tetanurae, Orionides, Avetheropoda, Coelurosauria, Tyrannoraptora, Maniraptoromorpha, Maniraptoriformes, Maniraptora, Pennaraptora, Paraves, Eumaniraptora, Averaptora, Avialae, Euavialae, Avebrevicauda, Pygostaylia, Ornithothoraces, Euornithes, Ornithuromorpha, Ornithurae, Neornithes, Neognathae, Neoaves, Inopinaves, Telluraves, Australaves, Eufalconimorphae, Psittacopasserae, Passeriformes, Tyranni, Thamnophilida, Thamnophilidae Referred Species: F. fulva (Fulvous Antshrike), F. unduligar (Undulated Antshrike), F. viridis (Black-throated Antshrike) Status: Extant, Least Concern Time and Place: Modern, no fossil record known  The species of Frederickena are known form the Amazon Rainforest in northern South America.  Physical Description: Frederickena antshrikes are small passeriformes that physically look a lot like the average passeriform. Their plumage tends to have somewhat complex patterning. The beak is not particularly large, and gray-black. The lower legs and feet are bare and gray in coloration. These antshrikes have a crest of feathers on their heads. Males tend to be slate gray all around, while females are browner. Diet: The diet of these birds isnt well known, but it appears that they eat a variety of arthropods, such as beetles, ants, grasshoppers, caterpillars, and spiders.  Behavior: The black-throated antshrike breeds between October and March. Very few nests of this genus have been described; it appears theyre open cups made of branches. It appears they lay two eggs at a time, which appear to hatch in June. Ecosystem: These birds live in the understory of lowland rainforests. It appears that theyre more common in densely-forested areas with light gaps. Black-thorated antshrikes prefer areas with sandy soil. Other: Although rare, these birds do not appear to be threatened. ~ By Henry Thomas Sources under the Cut  Zimmer, K.. & Isler, M.L. (2019). Black-throated Antshrike (Frederickena viridis). In: del Hoyo, J., Elliott, A., Sargatal, J., Christie, D.A. & de Juana, E. (eds.). Handbook of the Birds of the World Alive. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona. Zimmer, K., Isler, M.L. & de Juana, E. (2019). Undulated Antshrike (Frederickena unduliger). In: del Hoyo, J., Elliott, A., Sargatal, J., Christie, D.A. & de Juana, E. (eds.). Handbook of the Birds of the World Alive. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona.





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